vintage-freakshow:

Tattooed circus family from the early 1900s.

vintage-freakshow:

Tattooed circus family from the early 1900s.

naturepunk:

Never seen a melanistic serval before but I am officially transfixed. 

naturepunk:

Never seen a melanistic serval before but I am officially transfixed. 

sirenlovesong:

ariannagrandeofficial:

big-chicken:

cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat

this cat lives in a show horse barn which is why it walks and runs that way

THIS CAT THINKS ITS A HORSE

sirenlovesong:

ariannagrandeofficial:

big-chicken:

cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat

this cat lives in a show horse barn which is why it walks and runs that way

THIS CAT THINKS ITS A HORSE

tattrx:

Mico Goldobin Tattoo - Wolf Silhouette tattrx.com/artists/mico-goldobin

amroyounes:

8 vegetables that you can regrow again and again.

Scallions

You can regrow scallions by leaving an inch attached to the roots and place them in a small glass with a little water in a well-lit room.

Garlic

When garlic begins to sprout, you can put them in a glass with a little water and grow garlic sprouts. The sprouts have a mild flavor than garlic and can be added to salads, pasta and other dishes.

Bok Choy

Bok choy can be regrown by placing the root end in water in a well-lit area. In 1-2 weeks , you can transplant it to a pot with soil and grow a full new head.

Carrots

Put carrot tops in a dish with a little water. Set the dish in a well-lit room or a window sill.  You’ll have carrot tops to use in salads. 

Basil

Put clippings from basil with 3 to 4-inch stems in a glass of water and place it in direct sunlight. When the roots are about 2 inches long, plant them in pots to and in time it will grow a full basil plant.

Celery

Cut off the base of the celery and place it in a saucer or shallow bowl of warm water in the sun. Leaves will begin to thicken and grow in the middle of the base, then transfer the celery to soil. 

Romaine Lettuce

Put romaine lettuce stumps in a 1/2 inch of water. Re-water to keep water level at 1/2 inch. After a few days, roots and new leaves will appear and you can transplant it into soil.

Cilantro

The stems of cilantro will grown when placed in a glass of water. Once the roots are long enough, plant them in a pot in a well-lit room. You will have a full plant in a few months.

bpod-mrc:

22 November 2013
Packed with Precision
Unravel the DNA from a single cell in your body and it would stretch from your head to your feet. This string of genetic information is coiled and folded so precisely that sequences of genes, from various points along its length, are carefully distributed on the 46 chromosomes that determine how our bodies work and look. Recent advances in a technique called chromosome conformation capture – in which DNA is treated with chemicals so that distances between parts of the strand can be calculated – have enabled scientists to model the structure of chromosomes in 3D with greater accuracy than ever before. This is important to help understand how our genes work and why things sometimes go wrong. Pictured is a computer generated image (CGI) of the human X chromosome, with colours from red to blue representing increasing depth at which the component parts are buried in the complex structure.
Written by Mick Warwicker
—
Image by Tim Stevens The University of Cambridge Research published in Nature, September 2013

bpod-mrc:

22 November 2013

Packed with Precision

Unravel the DNA from a single cell in your body and it would stretch from your head to your feet. This string of genetic information is coiled and folded so precisely that sequences of genes, from various points along its length, are carefully distributed on the 46 chromosomes that determine how our bodies work and look. Recent advances in a technique called chromosome conformation capture – in which DNA is treated with chemicals so that distances between parts of the strand can be calculated – have enabled scientists to model the structure of chromosomes in 3D with greater accuracy than ever before. This is important to help understand how our genes work and why things sometimes go wrong. Pictured is a computer generated image (CGI) of the human X chromosome, with colours from red to blue representing increasing depth at which the component parts are buried in the complex structure.

Written by Mick Warwicker

Image by Tim Stevens
The University of Cambridge
Research published in Nature, September 2013